Abby Sher: Comedian, Performer, Writer, Mom

Abby Sher: Comedian, Performer, Writer, Mom

Sylvia & Me
Sylvia & Me
Abby Sher: Comedian, Performer, Writer, Mom
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When I started talking to Abby, I went into the conversation with the idea that I would be talking to someone who was funny. And for sure, she is. Funny, warm and able to talk candidly about herself. So candidly, that I knew this is exactly the conversation needed for so many. With much humor and humility, Abby speaks about her own struggles. Her struggles with an eating disorder, her intimidation of those who are supposed to be in the know and how improv and comedy helped her hide. And how she finally took control. Control that she is not letting go of.

“Anything I should know before I go home?” I asked the chief cardiologist, trying not to sound terrified.

“Just don’t lift stuff over 10 pounds for a few weeks.”

“My baby is over 10 pounds.”

Abby refers to herself as a performer, obsessive compulsive comedian, writer and mom. She wrote and performed with The Second City, The Upright Citizen’s Brigade, HBO, Nick Jr., and NPR. And the first all-female improv group found Abby among its performers.

Abby’s essays have appeared in The New York Times, Self, Jane, and Elle. One was adapted for the television series Modern Love. Abby currently co-hosts the Chucklepath Comedy Show with Molly Reisner. She is the author of five books including Miss You Love You Hate You Bye, named a 2020 Buzzfeed Best Book for Mental Health Awareness Month. And Abby most recently co-authored Sanctuary, a YA (Young Adult) dystopian novel.

A candid conversation with Abby:
The start of being funny
Why improv – putting it out there
Not being ‘precious’ about it
1st improv female group
Performer, comedian and mom – how about SpongeBob
Mental health issues
A reckoning and getting help

Finding solace in writing
Personal essays
Young adults, rock bottom and friendship
Miss You Love You Hate You Bye – friendship and mental health
Finding confidence to speak up – knowing your own body

Gillian Anderson, Founder My Friend Abby, Young Adult Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Advocate, Mental Health Revolutionary

Gillian Anderson, Founder My Friend Abby, Young Adult Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Advocate, Mental Health Revolutionary

Sylvia & Me
Sylvia & Me
Gillian Anderson, Founder My Friend Abby, Young Adult Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Advocate, Mental Health Revolutionary
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“Say their name. Say their name out loud.”

Gillian Anderson is starting a mental health revolution. Abby was just 15 when she succumbed to suicide. Abby is Gillian’s daughter.
The rate of young people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the United States who have died by suicide, has sharply risen in the past couple of years. Suicide is thought to be the second leading cause of death for Americans between 10 and 34.

Gillian’s mission now is to get rid of the stigma and shame of depression and anxiety. How did Gillian stay strong enough to make sure that Abby’s friends understood that Abby suffered from an illness? She founded My Friend Abby whose mission is to empower youth and young adults to actively create peer to peer connections. And to make sure that the stigma and shame surrounding mental illness is eliminated.

Before founding My Friend Abby, Gillian worked as Development Director for WSHU Public Radio.